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October 20, 2009

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Jagan,

I'd definitely be interested in your findings. And after all, what is a "norm" but peer pressure in action? As for Information Availability, that is a core tenet at EMC, but we still grapple with the challenges of making information available in the right place, in a compelling form that makes sense to the audience!

I haven't read "Nudge", but will definitely add it to my Kindle list!

Best,
Kathrin

Kate,
Peer Pressure is the key to behavioral changes. Have you read the book called "Nudge" by Prof Richard Thaler of University of Chicago. It addresses the problem of behavioral changes and suggest that "Peer Pressure" and "Information availability" are two factors that are required for behavioral changes.

How do you plan on having a information environment that provides enough feedback to employees so that they are motivated to join sustainability communities? How do you plan on seeding peer pressure so that it makes it fun to contribute and not a chore? A carefully designed system that addresses these questions in essential for empowering your change agents.

I have been researching this topic and would love to hear your thoughts on this. I would love to share my findings as well.

Thanks
Jagan

I couldn't agree with you more, Jagan. Behavior and cultural changes are absolutely the most challenging. What was intriguing to me about the submissions was not so much what they proposed to change, but that it was people in the trenches suggesting that their peers join them in doing something differently. I see that both as an indicator that change is happening, and as a critical driver for change. As any parent of a teenager knows, peer pressure is a powerful force And while it has potential for both good and evil...in this case, it's all good!

Thanks for sharing Kate...
It is interesting to see that a non-trivial percentage are interested in sustainability at EMC. Which totally shows that EMC has the potential to be a leading green thinker.

Would love to know about the behavioral issues that you have mentioned as these are the toughest issues to deal with and to solve.

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About Me

  • Kathrin ("Kate") Winkler is Sr Vice President and Chief Sustainability Officer at EMC Corporation, where she has a history of taking on entirely new roles in which she has to fill in the interstices between more traditional functions. She and her husband Angus are bicoastal on land, though they prefer to be 50 feet below the surface of tropical waters.



    I took on the full-time sustainability position in July of 2008, and am using this blog to document my personal and professional journey. Needless to say (but I'll say it anyway), these views are my own and do not necessarily represent those of my employer. Content published here is not read or approved in advance by EMC and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of EMC or any other employees of EMC.
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